Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10316/84319
Title: Heat-induced Bone Diagenesis Probed by Vibrational Spectroscopy
Authors: Marques, M. P. M. 
Mamede, A. P. 
Vassalo, A. R. 
Makhoul, C. 
Cunha, E. 
Gonçalves, D. 
Parker, S. F. 
Batista de Carvalho, L. A. E. 
Issue Date: 2018
Volume: 8
Issue: 1
Abstract: Complementary vibrational spectroscopic techniques – infrared, Raman and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) – were applied to the study of human bone burned under controlled conditions (400 to 1000 °C). This is an innovative way of tackling bone diagenesis upon burning, aiming at a quantitative evaluation of heat-induced dimensional changes allowing a reliable estimation of pre-burning skeletal dimensions. INS results allowed the concomitant observation of the hydroxyl libration (OHlibration), hydroxyl stretching (ν(OH)) and (OHlibration + ν(OH)) combination modes, leading to an unambiguous assignment of these INS features to bioapatite and confirming hydroxylation of bone’s inorganic matrix. The OHlib, ν(OH) and ν4(PO43−) bands were identified as spectral biomarkers, which displayed clear quantitative relationships with temperature revealing heat-induced changes in bone’s H-bonding pattern during the burning process. These results will enable the routine use of FTIR-ATR (Fourier Transform Infrared-Attenuated Total Reflectance) for the analysis of burned skeletal remains, which will be of the utmost significance in forensic, bioanthropological and archaeological contexts.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10316/84319
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-34376-w
Rights: openAccess
Appears in Collections:I&D CIAS - Artigos em Revistas Internacionais

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